“How much to print a house?”

April 3, 2019

author:

“How much to print a house?”

“It’s still magic even if you know how it is done” – Nothing explains the fourth industrial revolution better. Technology has transcended the ordinary and has become a surreal mix of science and futurism. Sure enough, today’s technology is tomorrow’s obsolete design but for now, we are going gaga over this era’s incomparable invention – 3D Printers. Understanding the theory behind 3D printing or ‘additive manufacturing’ is a five-finger-exercise; one must simply type a few digital codes and voila, the printer spits out a three-dimensional object. From drone parts to human organs and everything else in between, the printer can reproduce any three-dimensional object known to man, including food!

Medicine, automation, aerospace and fashion are four of the most successful industries in the country that have discovered the potential of this technology. Additive manufacturing is primarily used in the production of automotive parts such as doors, trunks and car panels that are later assembled together. Apart from this, the technology is being used by startups such as ‘Augrav’ and ‘icustommadeit’ to produce custom made gifts like 3D printed personalised gold jewellery.

Unlike the west, startups operating in the 3D printing space function in two areas – sale of 3D printers and 3D printing as a service. On average, 3D printers are available from Rs. 30,000 and can go up to Rs. 10,00,000 lakhs – depending on if you want to print – a toothpick or a house. Last year, Global 3D Labs launched Pramaan One, ‘India’s largest 3D printer’, which measures a metre on all sides. It can print whole furniture, home décor, functional robots and other large components at one go.

On one hand, complex surgeries have been made easier but on the other, 3D printers have not yet found their end-consumer usage in India. “The problem with 3D printing marketing in India is not the lack of capital investment, but the lack of ‘end product availability’ to consumers, and not just intermediaries. If that application can be derived, there will be healthy growth in investment,” said Swetha Ramesh, a 27-year-old software employee.
But it looks like investment is burgeoning with IT giants like Hewlett packard Inc bringing 3D printing technology to India about two years after it launched globally. HP is working with companies like Johnson & Johnson to print 3D parts that can be inserted in the human body—like an artificial hip or a dental implant, and this could potentially revolutionise the consumption of 3D printing technology in the country! Feels like we are stuck in an episode of Black Mirror, right?


Courtesy: Google

Courtesy: Google